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(meteorobs) Crazy, brain-dead (SRC) ideas...



Here below is my own mesage I have sent to:

vladimir.syromyatnikov@rsce.nasa.ru

about the Russian project involving giant mirrors to light up the
night sky. I hope many others will send their comments to this
contact person. I just had to do something about such a
rediculous, unthinkable, crazy idea...

>Dear sir,

>First, please let me briefly present myself. I am Pierre Martin,
>a 22 years old serious amateur astronomer, from Ontario, Canada,
>currently observing meteors for the purpose of scientific study.
>I have been doing visual meteor reports on a regular basis for
>such well known, reputable groups like the International Meteor
>Organisation (IMO) for the past 5 years.

>I have recently been aware of the experiment called Znamya 275 to be
>conducted the November of this year. From my current knowledge, this
>experiment is designed to light up parts of the world from reflected
>sunlight. If the experiment is successful, perhaps in the future, many
>more of these reflectors will bring "sunlight" in dark areas of the
>world, such as the Arctic, at a more economical price.

>Although this is a very intriguing experiment, I believe many negative
>consequences will follow. First, we, astronomers will greatly sufer
>from the unwanted light. Astronomers' equipement is often very
>sensitive to light. In order to gather useful scientific data, any
>unplanned malfunction or interuption will mean to start all over again.
>An astronomer's observing time under the stars is often very precious.
>All the dark, clear skies available around the world will be used by
>scientists to further understand the mysteries of the cosmos. Even a
>single, pass around the world by a reflecting mirror would destroy
>very important data and observations.

>Furthermore, an object roughly 10 times the brightness of the moon
>passing over a observer will certainly affect his dark vision and
>interrupt the session. (it is necessary for observers to maintain
>their dark eye adaptation to see the faintest sky objects.)

>Meteor astronomy is one field in astronomy that still needs to be
>extensively studied. Serious data collection can only be achieved
>by observations from the surface of the earth. Whenever periods of
>clear moonless nights occur throughout the year, observers from all
>parts of the world are needed to keep watch. And this needs to be done
>year after year. This effort by dedicated and patient observers will
>help better understand the meteor flux and its relation to comets and
>the Solar System. This in turn gives us hints about our own existence.

>If in the future, the sky on top of an observer is constantly lit
>by giant reflectors in space, then no observations will be possible from
>that location. Valuable data will be lost and "piece" after "piece" of
>the meteor puzzle will be lost. Our understanding of the Solar System
>and cosmos will be forever hidden because of our own "nitelights".

>Finally, I am curious to learn more about the consequences to wildlife,
>their natural habitats, etc... I hope consideration has taken into
>account the number of living beings to be affected (positively and
>negatively) from this. Have any study been conducted to learn about
>the impact on human and wild life before undergoing such a project ?

>Thank you for your time.

>Regards,


Pierre Martin                                             .  .      .
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Ottawa, Ontario, CAN                              / /   .     .  .   .   .
Visual meteor observer                          // /       / . .    .   .
Ottawa Astro Observers Group                    / /   .   *      .   .
Graphic Designer (National Aviation Museum)   =/ / |\      .       .      .
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